What Supplements Should I Take For My Thyroid?

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There are certain supplements that support thyroid function and maintaining optimal levels. It’s important to consider other possible problems, so not just your thyroid, such as low vitamin levels and other health conditions that can cause symptoms similar to hypothyroidism.

Supplementing may help with symptoms. 

I would always recommend consulting your doctor, pharmacist, a medical professional etc. before making any changes to your health regime. It can be dangerous if you take supplements and already have high/sufficient levels. Of course, all pregnant women should be especially careful and consult a medical professional.

If you’re gluten or dairy free, or have any other restrictions, do also always check that all supplements you take are free of the substance, too.

Most vitamins can be tested via doctors’ tests to learn your levels. 

  • B Vitamins/B-Complex – (B1, B2, B3, B6, B12) Can help tiredness, fatigue, metabolism and promote adrenal health and function. Vitamin B-12 and folic acid are both important for energy and heart protection. Folic acid is also good for preventing neural tube defects in a developing baby. It is also needed in order to make TSH. B3 is needed to keep all the body’s cells (including the endocrine glands) in efficient working order. People with hypothyroidism struggle to absorb B12.  A lack of B12 can cause mental illness, various neurological disorders, neuralgia, neuritis and bursitis. You can find this supplement online rather easily, but I’ve linked to an Amazon one, here: Solgar 500 mcg Vitamin B12 Vegetable Capsules – 50 Capsules.
  • Iron – For many thyroid patients, low iron can cause fatigue, aches and pains and lack of stamina. Always have your levels tested before taking a supplement as taking extra iron can be dangerous. Bisglycinate is a popular type of iron as it doesn’t cause stomach issues or constipation. You can find it here: Solgar Gentle Iron – Iron Bisglycinate – 180x20mg Vegicaps.
  • Vitamin E – An antioxidant, vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin important for many processes in the body, including producing TSH. Swanson Natural Vitamin E (400iu, 100 Softgels).
  • Selenium – Helps conversion of T4 to T3. Without it, T3 cannot be produced in the right amounts, and organs will function as if they are hypothyroid even though blood test levels are ‘normal’. It has also been shown to lower thyroid antibodies. Solgar 200g Yeast-Free Selenium Tablets – Pack of 250.
  • Vitamin C – Essential for the immune System, adrenals. The adrenal gland contains the highest concentration of vitamin C in the body. C plays a crucial role in both the adrenal cortex and adrenal medulla, which are responsible for responding to stress. Solgar Vitamin C 1000 100 Vegetable Capsules.
  • Iodine – A controversial one, many say you should only supplement it if you are definitely low in it, as it can do more harm than good if not. Sufficient iodine is needed to make thyroid hormone T4. If you are looking to try iodine, you can find it on Amazon here: Lugols Iodine – a 12% Solution 30ml.
  • Vitamin D3 and A – Good for joints, fatigue and a deficiency  in vitamin A or D can also stop T3 from correcting your metabolic rate and so leave you with low energy, cold intolerance and weight gain. Vitamin A must be accompanied by protein to make it available to the body, so if you are on a low protein diet, you may be deficient in this.  If you are low on Vitamin A, your ability to produce TSH is limited. This vitamin is required by the body to convert T4 to T3. Vitamin D has also been shown to lower antibodies. A popular vitamin D supplement can be seen here – Solgar, Natural Vitamin D3, 1000 IU, 180 Tablets.
  • Vitamin K2 – You should always take D with K2. K2 regulates calcium in the blood, so combining vitamin K2 with vitamin D3 is highly recommended because of the synergy between the two vitamins. Research shows a slower progression of calcification in those taking both vitamin K2 and vitamin D compared to those taking vitamin D alone. I use this one: Veganicity Vitamin K2 100µg Bone and Circulation Health Supplement – 60 Tablets
  • Zinc – Needed in order to make TSH. Research has shown that both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism result in zinc deficiency.  It also plays a role in the functioning of the immune system. Low zinc levels have been found to be common in obese people.  Zinc is needed to convert T4 into T3. Solgar 50 mg Zinc Tablets – Pack of 100
  • Fish Oil/Omega 3/Cod Liver Oil. – Cod Liver Oil is one of the best sources of omega 3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) and contains relatively high amounts of vitamin A and D. Good for lowering high blood pressure, reducing risk of osteoarthritis and maintaining joint and bone health. You can find it on Amazon here: Omega 3 Fish Oil 1000mg
  • Magnesium – Needed in order to make TSH and for the conversion of T4 into T3. It seems that a diet high in refined food and caffeine will encourage magnesium loss. Magnesium can also help cramps, energy and aches and pains. Magnesium Malate and Chelate is the most popular among thyroid patients, so I’ve provided a link to Magnesium Chelate here: Doctor’s Best High Absorption 100% Chelated Magnesium (120 Tablets)
  • Probiotic – Probiotics provide ‘good’ gut bacteria that can improve overall gut health and strengthen the immune system. Natures Aid Pro-100 Ultra Ultimate Strength Probiotic Complex
  • Bone broth – Bone broths are easy to make at home, but if you struggle to find the time like myself, this one is a good option to buy readymade: Premium Beef Bone Broth Gelatin. Bone broths helpful in treating leaky gut, because the collagen helps to heal the gut wall and aid digestion. The protein also helps to build muscle. They can also help with inflammation such as aches and pains in the joints and muscles, so it’s worth giving it a shot.
  • Digestive Enzymes –Doctor’s Best Digestive Enzymes – 90 Vegetarian Capsules

You can click on the hyperlinks in the above post to learn more and see references to information given.

If you found this article helpful please take a moment to share this post on social media so we can help other Thyroid Warriors get better and spread awareness.

Written by Rachel, The Invisible Hypothyroidism

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Rachel Hill, Thyroid Patient Advocate, blogger and author, has Six 2018 WEGO Health Award Nominations. She is a highly ranked writer appearing in the Top Hypothyroidism Websites and Top Thyroid Websites and has worked with The National Academy of Hypothyroidism, The BBC, The Mighty, Yahoo, MSN and ThyroidChange, to name just a few. She is well-recognised as a useful contributor to the thyroid community and also contributed the foreword to Emily Kyle’s The 30-Minute Thyroid Cookbook.

7 thoughts on “What Supplements Should I Take For My Thyroid?

  1. Great summary on why to take each of the listed supplement thanks. A caution on the Vitamin A; too much during pregnancy can harm the unborn child.

  2. I would like to suggest that you look into iodine skin patches to test your iodine levels. A simple google search will do. I had all the symptoms of hypothyroidism but when my doc checked my thyroid it was “normal”. The test in question was a cascade test which tests TSH first and only then if that is off are T3 and T4 tested. My T3 and T4 were NOT tested.

    I had resolved that it might be an adrenal problem but then stumbled on the iodine patch test and low and behold my iodine was VERY low. How could this be? I have been taking iodine (1 mg per day) for a decade .. well above the minimum required amount.

    Well here in the states bakers used to have to add iodine to dough. A typical white bread sandwich in the 60’s would get you over 1 mg of iodine from the bread. But then the FDA allowed them to substitute with bromide. It turns out that bromide, a carcinogen in most countries, not only is not iodine but it is so chemically similar that it can be taken up by iodine receptors and block them. Chlorine and fluoride do the same thing.

    Now I use a patch daily along with 1 mg iodine supplements. Without supplements the patch last about 5 hours when it should last 12 hours. With 5 mg of iodine the patch lasts about 10 hours.

    More important, my hypo symptoms are completely gone in just days and my brain is better than it has been for many years. My indigestion is gone as well. I am who I used to be!

    Iodine is used and stored, not just in the thyroid, but also other organs like the skin, your brain, etc. Even those without a thyroid should do this test. I bet, especially if they are in the US where fluoride and bromide run rampant, they will be low .. BUT TEST FIRST with the patch method. Iodine deficiency is a HUGE problem. It’s estimated by doctors that 70-90% of Americans are deficient, and so far that bears out with all of my friends.

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