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Mental Health / My Personal Experiences

What I Mean When I Say I Don’t Like Mornings

What I Mean When I Say I Don't Like Mornings
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Mornings are the worst time of the day for me. They never used to be. I used to be that annoying morning person who chose to get up at 7am on the weekends. Even as a teenager.

But health conditions hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s and Adrenal Fatigue render me quite useless in the morning.

Unless I’m able to sleep in until about 8:30-9am, I wake up feeling fatigued, no matter what time I went to bed the night before. I’ve gone to bed at 7pm before, woke up at 6:30am and felt even more tired than when I went to bed the night before. It’s common for thyroid and adrenal patients, unfortunately.

But it’s not just the fatigue; I wake up feeling nauseous, weak in every inch of my body and unable to think clearly until at least 11am. I have adrenal fatigue in the form of high cortisol and I’m trying my best to lower it, but it’s a battle. I wake up feeling unwell, as if I have the flu, a stomach bug and haven’t slept in five years.

Most days, I have no idea how I manage to make it in to work, let alone get showered, dressed smartly and hair and make up done so I look presentable and ready for the day ahead. Each one of these tasks uses up spoons and I’m even more exhausted by the time I reach the office. But I’m a stubborn person.

When I wake up, it’s a battle to convince myself to step out of bed when I feel so unwell. But this is my life.

I’m just tired. Tired of living. Tired of existing. Sick and tired of being sick and tired.

Do you ever feel like this?

See also: How To Create a Thyroid-Loving Morning Routine For More Energy

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Please remember that if you’re a thyroid patient living with poor mental health or lingering physical symptoms, that you don’t have to live this way. To address why you may still be feeling unwell (often despite being on thyroid medication too), please see this article and go through each suggestion, putting your thyroid jigsaw back together.

You can click on the hyperlinks in the above post to learn more and see references to information given.

See also:

Be Your Own Thyroid Advocate Book Cover

The book Be Your Own Thyroid Advocate: When You’re Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tiredalso builds on this article in detail and covers how Rachel recovered her health.

About Author

Rachel Hill is the highly ranked and multi-award winning thyroid patient advocate, writer, speaker and author behind The Invisible Hypothyroidism. Her thyroid advocacy work includes writing articles, authoring books, producing her Thyroid Family email newsletters and speaking on podcasts, as well as being a founding board member for the American College of Thyroidology. She is well-recognised as a crucial and influential contributor to the thyroid community and has a large social media presence. Her books include "Be Your Own Thyroid Advocate" and "You, Me and Hypothyroidism".

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