FAQs

Why did you set up this website?

Because I have learnt a lot on my thyroid journey, through personal experience, books, other sites and blogs and by listening to the thyroid patients in my Facebook support group. Patients can often tell you more than anyone about the condition. I wanted to share all of this because I believe strongly that it can benefit others.

I also hope to raise awareness of hypothyroidism, be a voice for the many thyroid patients worldwide who need to be heard and maybe even improve the diagnosis and management of hypothyroidism.

When I was reading various books, websites and work by thyroid doctors and advocates, I oftentimes found it hard to absorb a lot of it and even understand some of the phrasing or detail, so I also wanted to make information on thyroid disease easier to grasp and use in your own thyroid health, especially for those of us who have thyroid brain fog! I wanted to create easy to understand yet informative blogs, articles and books that sound as if they’re coming from a friend. Information on some websites can be written very scarily and negatively.

Are you a doctor?

No, I am not a doctor. I have qualifications and certificates (and am always studying for more) in various subjects and topics, such as Diet and Nutrition, Reflexology and Life Coaching, which are useful in my work as a thyroid advocate. But if you are planning to make any changes to your health regime, I would always suggest working with a doctor, or consulting them first. Doing anything mentioned on this site without medical input and guidance can be dangerous. Please see my legal info and disclaimer here.

As I’ve already explained, I am a thyroid patient and advocate.

Why do you hate doctors so much?

I don’t! I respect doctors who will listen to their thyroid patients, will work with them, who will be open-minded and treat them as an individual. They should treat each patient individually and acknowledge that we’re not all the same and many do not recover on standard T4-only medicine. If it doesn’t work for us, they need to acknowledge this and explore why and help us to fix or address it. Sadly, a medical professional like this is often hard to find.

To the doctors who already do this, thank you. We’re  often not able to get better without you, and you are very valued and appreciated.

Some people even have to go private with their healthcare to get this experience.

Is NDT the best thyroid medication?

It’s not as simple an answer as you think. The ‘best’ medication is what works best for you, and you feel comfortable with. T4, T3, combination therapy or NDT all work well for different people.

You should work with a doctor to find out what best works for you.

Should I switch to NDT?

This is up to you, as mentioned above. If you do want to try NDT, I would always suggest doing so with the guidance and monitoring of a doctor, as getting them to prescribe it for you is the best option. You can still self-source, but there are obviously risks associated with that. It can be dangerous so it is not to be taken lightly at all.

If you do self-source, aim to find and work with a doctor who knows how to dose and monitor your progress properly. If you choose to self manage and self-medicate, which should be a  last resort, you must be willing to accept the risk associated.

What blood tests should I ask my doctor for?

To check thyroid function, TSH, Free T3 and Free T4, are the basic ones you definitely need. If you can also get your Reverse T3, thyroid antibodies, Vitamin D, B, Iron, Ferritin and adrenals function (with a 24 hour saliva test only, not blood or urine) then this is hugely beneficial. A lot of these go awry with thyroid conditions, so worth keeping on top of. They can also cause similar symptoms to hypothyroid symptoms.

Why do you talk about adrenal glands when your blog is about the thyroid gland?

Because it’s all connected. The thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system, and so are the adrenal glands. When one isn’t working right, the other often doesn’t as well. You need to correct both to feel better if they’re out of sync. They go hand in hand.

Do you make money from your blog? 

For the first eighteen months of its existence, I made no money whatsoever – but did put a lot of my own money and time in to building and maintaining The Invisible Hypothyroidism. I eventually changed any links I already had on my blog (e.g. to supplements or books on amazon) to amazon affiliate links and then as my reputation grew, I began writing for other websites and organisations and charged for my time and work for them. However, this has never changed how I write, what I write about and how I work. Helping other thyroid patients will always be my priority. But I’ll always also want to remain as transparent as possible.

Why do you share such personal experiences on here?

I originally started blogging a few months before it went live. It was an outlet for me – somewhere to express my feelings, vent my frustrations and deal with what I was going through. I wasn’t sure if I would ever turn it to LIVE, but in the end I did, because I felt that sharing my experiences would help others going through the same thing realise that they’re not alone, that they don’t have to keep quiet about what they go through, that we’re not lazy, we shouldn’t feel ashamed and it’s good to advocate for ourselves.

Find out more in my book, Be Your Own Thyroid Advocate: When You’re Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired