May 23rd – 29th is International Thyroid Awareness Week 2016

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International Thyroid Awareness Week 2016 begins on May 23rd and continues through to May 29th, so with that in mind, I have changed my Facebook page and Facebook group banners to support this. This years’ week-long campaign is focusing on hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism in young children in particular. So I will be posting things in relation to this throughout the week. 

On Wednesday, it is World Thyroid Day, and I will be posting quite a few photos to raise awareness about the conditions, symptoms, testing and related conditions, on Wednesday, too.

International Thyroid Awareness Week this year will be aiming to encourage parents to have their children tested if they think they are displaying the symptoms of hyper/hypothyroidism. Some children are born without a thyroid gland and testing at birth is also important.

It is important for parents to be able to spot the signs and symptoms. Testing is simple and children benefit from early diagnosis and management of the condition. Passing thyroid disorders on to your children is possible if you or anyone else in your family have a thyroid disorder. It can also show up with no known family history, too, though.

My doctor told me that I have a 1 in 3 chance of passing it on to a daughter and 1 in 7 to a son.

In children, hypothyroidism can show as a child that moves slowly compared to their friends and not appearing to grow as fast. They may be often tired and sometimes sluggish. A child with hyperthyroidism could be overly active, fidgety, irritable and easily upset.

If thyroid hormone imbalances are undiagnosed and left untreated, they may have a detrimental effect on a child’s brain development, growth, performance in school, puberty, overall metabolism and general well-being. However, with diagnosis and proper treatment, children can lead normal and healthy lives.

You can click on the hyperlinks in the above post to learn more and see references to information given, but more reading and references can also be found at:

https://www.thyroidweek.com/en/

If you found this article helpful please take a moment to share this post on social media so we can help other Thyroid Warriors get better and spread awareness.

Written by Rachel, The Invisible Hypothyroidism

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Rachel Hill, Thyroid Patient Advocate, blogger and author, has Six 2018 WEGO Health Award Nominations. She is a highly ranked writer appearing in the Top Hypothyroidism Websites and Top Thyroid Websites and has worked with The National Academy of Hypothyroidism, The BBC, The Mighty, Yahoo, MSN and ThyroidChange, to name just a few. She is well-recognised as a useful contributor to the thyroid community and also contributed the foreword to Emily Kyle’s The 30-Minute Thyroid Cookbook.

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